Common Symptoms of Hyperactivity/Impulsivity

Common Symptoms of Hyperactivity/Impulsivity


Early Childhood (preschool and early school years)

  • Behavior within normal range: The child runs in circles, does not stop to rest, may bang into objects or people, and asks questions constantly.

  • Behavior signaling a hyperactivity/impulsivity problem: The child frequently runs into people or knocks things down during play, gets injured frequently, and does not want to sit for stories or games.

  • Behavior signaling the possible presence of ADHD, hyperactive-impulsive type: The child runs through the house, jumps and climbs excessively on furniture, will not sit still to eat or be read to, and is often into things.

Middle Childhood (later primary grades through preteen years)

  • Behavior within normal range: The child plays active games for long periods. The child may occasionally do things impulsively, particularly when excited.

  • Behavior signaling a hyperactivity/impulsivity problem: The child may butt into other children’s games, interrupt frequently, and have problems completing chores.

  • Behavior signaling the possible presence of ADHD, hyperactive-impulsive type: The child is often talking and interrupting, cannot sit still at mealtimes, is often fidgeting when watching television, makes noise that is disruptive, and grabs toys or other objects from others.

Adolescence

  • Behavior within normal range: The adolescent engages in active social activities (eg, dancing) for long periods, and may engage in risky behaviors with peers.

  • Behavior signaling a hyperactivity/impulsivity problem: The adolescent engages in “fooling around” that begins to annoy others, and he fidgets in class or while watching television.

  • Behavior signaling the possible presence of ADHD, hyperactive-impulsive type: The adolescent is restless and fidgety while doing any and all quiet activities, interrupts and “bugs” other people, and gets into trouble frequently. Hyperactive symptoms decrease or are replaced with a sense of restlessness.


Source ADHD: What Every Parent Needs to Know (Copyright © American Academy of Pediatrics)

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